Don’t Dare to Call Me Old!!

Sarah Harper, a gerontologist who is director of the Oxford Institute of Ageing, proposed a different approach to the language we use about ageing, suggesting that people in their 60s and possibly 70s and 80s should still be considered active adults. She said there was a danger of neglecting what true old age should be: a time of withdrawal and peace and reflection. It can be a difficult time but “it is a time we need to claim as a special time because we are finite beings … we will die”.

Older; With Bipolar

Young’s longstanding research interest is in optimizing the use of medicine for treatment of older people with severe mood disorders. While less is known about milder forms, severe bipolar disorder in elder adults seems to fall into three categories. He defines below.

Retirement Security: It’s Not Just About the Money

Retired or not, a person's sense of worthiness requires some sort of 'purpose'; a sense of accomplishment from whatever activities are available in his or her environment.  According to Abraham Maslow, the most basic needs are the physiological, food, air, sleep the the like.  The needs that take the most effort, the most conscious effort, … Continue reading Retirement Security: It’s Not Just About the Money

Gene Testing and Long-Term Care Insurance

Approximately 5.5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, making up half of all nursing home residents, but very few people have been tested for it's specific gene. Last month, however, the gene testing company 23andMe started offering tests that reveal whether people carry the gene, while assessing their risks for developing certain conditions. Following the wave, … Continue reading Gene Testing and Long-Term Care Insurance

Your Spit Holds a Clue to Brain Health

Your spit may hold a clue to future brain health. Investigators at the Beaumont Research Institute, part of Beaumont Health in Michigan, are hopeful that their study involving small molecules in saliva will help identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease -- a neurologic condition predicted to reach epidemic proportions worldwide by 2050. Given … Continue reading Your Spit Holds a Clue to Brain Health

What Are The 7 Dimensions of Wellness?

Wellness is much more than merely physical health, exercise or nutrition. It is the full integration of states of physical, mental, and spiritual well-being: social, emotional, spiritual, environmental, occupational, intellectual and physical wellness.

Advocacy Services for The Elderly – 1

 The ABA Commission on Law and Aging is a collaborative and interdisciplinary leader of the Association’s work to strengthen and secure the legal rights, dignity, autonomy, quality of life, and quality of care of aging persons. The Commission accomplishes its work through research, policy development, advocacy, education, training, and through assistance to lawyers, bar associations, … Continue reading Advocacy Services for The Elderly – 1

Supportive Kids Help Lower Seniors’ Dementia Risk

The quality of your relationships with your adult children and spouse might influence your chances of developing dementia, new research suggests. While having supportive adult children appeared to be protective, having unsupportive relatives of all ilk seemed to have an opposite -- and more dramatic -- effect, the British scientists reported.

Getting Lost May Indicate Alzheimer’s

Losing your navigational skills or getting lost even though you are in a familiar setting may provide some of the first indications that Alzheimer’s disease could affect you in later life. This is a preliminary discovery of a remarkable long-term study being carried out by scientists who are searching to uncover how dementia first affects the brain. The Prevent project – based at Edinburgh University, though it involves several other UK research centres – is intended to detect signs of Alzheimer’s in people while they are still relatively young. Usually, the disease does not show its symptoms until individuals are in their 60s, by which time it has already done profound damage to the brain.

Brain Awareness Week

Every March, BAW unites the efforts of partner organizations worldwide in a celebration of the brain for people of all ages. Activities are limited only by the organizers’ imaginations and include open days at neuroscience labs; exhibitions about the brain; lectures on brain-related topics; social media campaigns; displays at libraries and community centers; classroom workshops; … Continue reading Brain Awareness Week