Better to forget?

I spoke with Blake Richards, one of the co-authors of the paper, who applies artificial intelligence theories to his study of how the brain learns. He says that in the AI world, there's something called over-fitting — a phenomenon in which a machine stores too much information, hindering its ability to behave intelligently. He hopes … Continue reading Better to forget?

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Defining Sedentary Behavior; An Emerging Global Public Health Priority

A worldwide network of scientists examining the links between sedentary lifestyles and health problems such as obesity and cardiovascular disease today announced a new dictionary of terms to support research into sedentary behaviour. The results of the 'terminology consensus project' led by the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute's (CHEO RI) Sedentary Behaviour Research … Continue reading Defining Sedentary Behavior; An Emerging Global Public Health Priority

Your Spit Holds a Clue to Brain Health

Your spit may hold a clue to future brain health. Investigators at the Beaumont Research Institute, part of Beaumont Health in Michigan, are hopeful that their study involving small molecules in saliva will help identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease -- a neurologic condition predicted to reach epidemic proportions worldwide by 2050. Given … Continue reading Your Spit Holds a Clue to Brain Health

Video – Successful Aging and Your Brain

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCTDlg9bIL8 Successful aging acknowledges the fact that there is a growing number of older adults functioning at a high level and contributing to the society. Scientists working in this area seek to define what differentiates successful from usual aging in order to design effective strategies and medical interventions to protect health and well-being from aging.[1][3][4][5][6][7] … Continue reading Video – Successful Aging and Your Brain

Death After Life? Reports of brain activity after clinical death.

When the Canadian team looked for this phenomenon in their human patients, they came up empty. “We did not observe a delta wave within 1 minute following cardiac arrest in any of our four patients,” they report. If all of this feels frustratingly inconsequential, welcome to the strange and incredibly niche field of necroneuroscience, where no one really knows what’s actually going on. But what we do know is that very strange things can happen at the moment of death – and afterwards – with a pair of studies from 2016 finding that more than 1,000 genes were still functioning several days after death in human cadavers.