The Good News About Getting Older

Nine Keys to Aging Well Please forward this to those with doubts about the benefits of aging. Psychologist and storyteller Jonathan Young served as the founding curator of the Joseph Campbell Archives. Information on Dr. Young's books and seminars is available at folkstory.com along with articles and interviews. The Good News About Getting Older summarizes the … Continue reading The Good News About Getting Older

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Better to forget?

I spoke with Blake Richards, one of the co-authors of the paper, who applies artificial intelligence theories to his study of how the brain learns. He says that in the AI world, there's something called over-fitting — a phenomenon in which a machine stores too much information, hindering its ability to behave intelligently. He hopes … Continue reading Better to forget?

Nutrition in healthy aging

The significant increase in average life expectancy is one of society’s great achievements which has been associated with a shift in the leading causes of illnesses from infectious to noncommunicable diseases.  It is well known that the percentage of populations categorized as elderly (e.g. 65 years and older) will increase dramatically in almost every country … Continue reading Nutrition in healthy aging

Do we have a moral obligation as a society to ensure that genetic engineering is pursued, or should we do everything possible to ensure that we do not open this Pandora’s box?

International Ethics Project

More recently, the human race stands at a threshold like never before. The human race now has the tools to restruct its own hereditary capacities (Kevles, 2016).The enhancement of human beings has materialized into an ever expanding topic in recent years. As science and technology continues to develop, people are beginning to realize that some of the basic factors in the human race may be altered with, in the future. The human condition could be altered with through the improvement of basic human abilities (Bostrom & Roache, 2008). Genetic Engineering can be defined as the intentional manipulation of genetic material so as to attain an intended and desired result. The process of Genetic Engineering employs various molecular techniques to manipulate the genetic material of cells and/or organisms to alter hereditary traits or produce biological products (Kumar & Sahal, 2014). This post looks at various considerations relating to genetic engineering.

Life extension

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Additional Aging Resources: Aging in the Media

A Boomer's Life After 50 Lindsey McDivitt's Blog Mid-Century Modern Magazine   Mid-Life Boulevard National Public Radio's "Next Avenue" As Time Goes By   Related articles The Trump Budget Cuts Disability Benefits. That Will Hurt Trump Counties Dream Analyst, David Rivinus, Will Be Interviewed by National Public Radio’s Stu Taylor

Brain Awareness Week

Every March, BAW unites the efforts of partner organizations worldwide in a celebration of the brain for people of all ages. Activities are limited only by the organizers’ imaginations and include open days at neuroscience labs; exhibitions about the brain; lectures on brain-related topics; social media campaigns; displays at libraries and community centers; classroom workshops; … Continue reading Brain Awareness Week

Video – Successful Aging and Your Brain

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCTDlg9bIL8 Successful aging acknowledges the fact that there is a growing number of older adults functioning at a high level and contributing to the society. Scientists working in this area seek to define what differentiates successful from usual aging in order to design effective strategies and medical interventions to protect health and well-being from aging.[1][3][4][5][6][7] … Continue reading Video – Successful Aging and Your Brain

Death After Life? Reports of brain activity after clinical death.

When the Canadian team looked for this phenomenon in their human patients, they came up empty. “We did not observe a delta wave within 1 minute following cardiac arrest in any of our four patients,” they report. If all of this feels frustratingly inconsequential, welcome to the strange and incredibly niche field of necroneuroscience, where no one really knows what’s actually going on. But what we do know is that very strange things can happen at the moment of death – and afterwards – with a pair of studies from 2016 finding that more than 1,000 genes were still functioning several days after death in human cadavers.